Friday, September 15, 2006

Change One Letter Meme

I couldn't resist this meme, courtesy of Sarah: Change one letter in the title of a historical novel and add a plot. Here are some results from me, with the more obscure real titles in parenthesis:

St. Thomas's Ewe. The rise and fall of Thomas More, seen by his favorite sheep. (St. Thomas's Eve)

Wine to the Kingmaker. With more and more guests coming into the Earl of Warwick's great hall every day, his devoted butler struggles to keep everyone happy. (Wife to the Kingmaker)

The Crimson Pedal and the White. In Victorian England, a bicycle maker rebels against monochrome machines and produces his own colorful creation.

King's Bake. Having scandalized his subjects with his love for water sports and thatching, King Edward II courts further trouble when he turns to cooking. (King's Wake)

Gone With the Wine. The cruel Yankees rob Tara's cellar.

The Virgin's Loner. Elizabeth I can't understand why fun-loving Robert Dudley is suddenly spending so much time by himself.

A Pride of Rings. William Marshal's wife gives him some jewelry for their anniversary, and he really, really likes it. (A Pride of Kings)

Catherine. During a midlife crisis, Katherine Swynford scandalizes the nobility by changing the spelling of her name.

Lady of the Barter. Joan, the Fair Maid of Kent, goes to the marketplace and discovers that she has a real talent for haggling.

The Traitor's Wide. Imprisoned in the Tower of London for her husband's misdeeds, Eleanor de Clare finds that the food is a lot better than she expected. (Oh, c'mon, you can guess the original)

4 comments:

Alianore said...

Hehe, love The Traitor's Wide. I've done my own list now - this was too much fun to resist!

Sarah said...

Gone with the Wine! LOL! I thought of what I might do with that title, but that version never occurred to me. These are great.

Susan Higginbotham said...

Thanks, ladies!

Frank said...

"Catherine. During a midlife crisis, Katherine Swynford scandalizes the nobility by changing the spelling of her name."

BWAH! That cracked me up.

"King's Bake. Having scandalized his subjects with his love for water sports and thatching, King Edward II courts further trouble when he turns to cooking. (King's Wake)"

Not to be vulgar, but when I see "scandalized his subjects with his love for water sports..." I think of a completely different kind of "water sports" that most CERTAINLY would have scandalized his subjects.